February 2010 Newsletter
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News and Events
The Scripteasers will do a reading of William's play N.I.C.E. in San Diego on 5 February at 7:30 PM. Admission is free and everyone is invited. For more information, visit http://www.scripteasers.org or send an email to william@aitheater.org.

Gay and Lesbian Times came out with their "Best Plays of 2009" annual feature and William's play "Dickinson: The Secret Story of Emily Dickinson" was well represented. GLT featured Dickonson on the list and said, "Al Germani’s Lynx Performance Theatre brought us Dickinson and a luminous Rhianna Basore as the famous American poet." Rhianna Basore won for Best actress for her role in the play, and Greg Wittman won for best actor for his role in the play.

Dickinson was an invite selection to the Midtown International Theater Festival (MITF) in NYC. There will be eight performances of the play off-Broadway during June, and then five additional performances at MITF during July.
Poetry Corner
by William Roetzheim
It's often fun for a poet to write poetry using a form. The form provides rules that must be followed, and the result can be something akin to working crossword puzzles in terms of problem solving. One example of a form is a Villanelle. Here's a bit of information about the form itself from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villanelle

A villanelle is a poetic form which entered English-language poetry in the 1800s from the imitation of French models.[1] The word derives from the Italian villanella from Latin villanus (rustic). [2] A villanelle has only two rhyme sounds. The first and third lines of the first stanza are rhyming refrains that alternate as the third line in each successive stanza and form a couplet at the close. A villanelle is nineteen lines long, consisting of five tercets and one concluding quatrain. [3] In music, it is a dance form, accompanied by sung lyrics or an instrumental piece based on this dance form.

And here's a example of a Villanelle that I wrote for THOUGHTS I LEFT BEHIND, cautioning the reader of the danger of listening to friends who "third party" you by seeming to offer you impartial advice while really working to destroy a relationship.

Beware of “Friends”: A Villanelle

Beware of friends with cautious love advice.
I sing a song of warning from the heart.
They kill your love with words, as trust departs.

With arm on shoulder, walking you apart
they offer words of wisdom, so concise.
Beware of friends with cautious love advice.

“It’s up to you,” they say, but then impart
an evil thought, a fear, to be precise,
to kill your love with words, as trust departs.

With honey words, soft eyes, they sink a dart
with poison for the human sacrifice.
Beware of friends with cautious love advice.

“If it were me,” they say, “I’d play it smart.”
“Don’t be a fool,” they cry, “You’ll pay the price.”
They kill your love with words, as trust departs.

As they plant seeds, destroy your counterpart,
their evil game is done, crushed hearts their vice.
Beware of friends with cautious love advice,
that kills your love with words, as trust departs.

Here's what is perhaps the most famous Villanelle ever written. This is from THE GIANT BOOK OF POETRY and it was written by Elizabeth Bishop.

One Art

The art of losing isn't hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn't hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother's watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn't hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn't a disaster.

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan't have lied. It's evident
the art of losing's not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.
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Calendar
N.I.C.E.
San Diego Scripteasers reading
Friday, 5 February, 2010, 7:30 PM

Dickinson
The Grand Theatre
358 West 44TH ST
New York, NY 10036
Tuesday, June 01, 2010 8:00 PM
Thursday, June 03, 2010 8:00 PM
Saturday, June 05, 2010 8:00 PM
Wednesday, June 09, 2010 2:00 PM
Friday, June 11, 2010 8:00 PM
Sunday, June 13, 2010 3:00 PM
Wednesday, June 16, 2010 8:00 PM
Saturday, June 19, 2010 2:00 PM

T.S. Eliot
The Grand Theatre
358 West 44TH ST
New York, NY 10036
Wednesday, June 02, 2010 2:00 PM
Friday, June 04, 2010 8:00 PM
Sunday, June 06, 2010 3:00 PM
Wednesday, June 09, 2010 8:00 PM
Saturday, June 12, 2010 2:00 PM
Tuesday, June 15, 2010 8:00 PM
Thursday, June 17, 2010 8:00 PM
Saturday, June 19, 2010 8:00 PM

N.I.C.E.
The Grand Theatre
358 West 44TH ST
New York, NY 10036
Wednesday, June 02, 2010 8:00 PM
Saturday, June 05, 2010 2:00 PM
Tuesday, June 08, 2010 8:00 PM
Thursday, June 10, 2010 8:00 PM
Saturday, June 12, 2010 8:00 PM
Wednesday, June 16, 2010 2:00 PM
Friday, June 18, 2010 8:00 PM
Sunday, June 20, 2010 3:00 PM

View our calendar on-line
Awards
Rhianna Basore, Best actress of 2009 for her role in Dickinson;

Greg Wittman, Best Actor of 2009, for his role in Dickinson.
This Issue

About William Roetzheim
William Roetzheim is an award winning poet, playwright, and
writer. He began his career in the fine arts in 2001 after retiring from the technology industry. Since that time he has founded a highly aclaimed small press, written or edited several award winning books, directed and produced fifteen spoken word audio CDs, and with his wife Marianne, started an art focused Bed and Breakfast outside of San Diego.
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